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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Hawaiian monk seal pupping season approaches. See guidelines and information about how best to help protect one of
Hawaiʻi's endangered, endemic mammals, below. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO CALLED FOR U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL WILLIAM BARR TO RESIGN today. She and other Senators accused him of being involved in an "ongoing campaign to erode the independence of immigration courts," including changing court rules to allow more political influence over decisions and promoting partisan judges to the Board of Immigration Appeals. The Senators' letter reads: "The administration's gross mismanagement of these courts" will do "lasting damage to public confidence in the immigration court system."
     In addition, more than 2,000 former Justice Department officials have also called on Barr to resign. Hirono said, "The President and his handmaiden Bill Barr are politicizing the Justice Department to go after his enemies. To watch my Republican colleagues twist themselves into a pretzel to lend cover to @realDonaldTrump is showing the American people how bankrupt the Republican party is.
     "Serving as Attorney General of the United Statesis a sacred trust and Bill Barr has repeatedly betrayed that trust by politicizing the Department of Justice in service of Donald Trump. It is long past time for his resignation.
     "Immigration judges should be allowed to be fair and independent, not instruments of @realDonaldTrump's cruel, anti-immigrant campaign. The Trump administration's assault on immigration courts undermines the ability of asylum seekers and immigrants to get a fair hearing.
U.S. Attorney General William Barr.
Photo from ABC
     "Since I called for AG Barr to resign in 2019, he's shown no sign of independence as he continues to act as the attorney for @realDonaldTrump, not the people. With this administration it seems the rule of law, our independent judiciary, and checks and balances are out the window."
     Last week, Pres. Donald Trump tweeted complaints about U.S. Prosecutors' recommendation for a seven to nine year sentence for his longtime adviser Roger Stone. Stone was convicted of lying to Congress, witness tampering, and obstructing a congressional investigation. Trump Called it "a horrible and very unfair situation. The real crimes were on the other side, as nothing happens to them. Cannot allow this miscarriage of justice!"
     After the tweet, the U.S. Attorney's Office filed for a shorter sentence, stating the original sentence "does not accurately reflect the Department of Justice's position on what would be a reasonable sentence in this matter." After the filing, all four prosecutors on the Stone case withdrew from the case, and the Washington, D.C., Assistant U.S. Attorney, resigned.
     Afterward, Trump tweeted that Barr took charge of a case "that was totally out of control and perhaps should not have even been brought." Barr said Trump's tweets about DOJ "make it impossible for me to do my job and to assure the courts and the prosecutors in the department that we're doing our work with integrity."
     Hawaiʻi Sen. Brian Schatz said, "We need to hear from the Attorney General. This scandal grows. The DOJ itself appears to have been corrupted by a President who rewards his friends and punishes his enemies. Media should treat this like a potentially explosive abuse of power even if this takes more than ten seconds to explain.
     "It is nearly impossible to find a benign explanation for this. The DOJ [Investigator General] needs to investigate, and the House and Senate should conduct hearings to find the paper trail and hear from the AG under oath.
     "So for those of you who with a day job, here's what happened: Roger Stone gets recommended for 7-9 years for his crimes. Trump tweets that it's unfair. DOJ then intervenes to reduce the prison term, something that is literally never done. 3 prosecutors just resigned in protest.
     "Bill Barr is demonstrating his independence just like the Astros learned their lesson, and just like Republicans will protect pre-existing conditions," said Schatz.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

COVID-19 coronavirus is seen in yellow, emerging from cells (in blue and pink) cultured in the lab. This image is from 
a scanning electron microscope at National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-Rocky Mountain Laboratories.
TO CONTAIN CORONAVIRUS, MORE COORDINATION OF GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IS NEEDED, said Sen. Brian Schatz today. Interviewed on MSNBC, he gave examples of the federal administration having difficulty steering the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. He characterized the go-between individuals in the Trump administration as "bumbling incompetents."
     Schatz talked about Hawaiʻi specifically, as a place where people were destined for quarantine after exposure to the virus overseas. He talked about planes with these people in the air with no firm destination for a quarantine center. Hawaiʻi officials also had no idea how many planes were headed to Hawaiʻi or when they were arriving, nor how many people to expect. First, they were told to place quarantines in the civilian population, to which Hawaiʻi Attorney General Claire Connors said, "No way," Schatz related. Then, quarantinees were to be taken to a secure facility at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, but the Department of Defense said "No," said Schatz. He said that in the few hours they had to make arrangements, it was "nuts."
     Schatz said the Trump administration is "incompetent" and that state governments like Hawaiʻi "are cleaning up the mess." He said the good news is that "on the ground, things are safe in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere across the country, but it's not because of anything the Trump Administration has done – it's been in spite of it."
This image from a scanning electron microscope shows, in orange, the 
coronavirus that causes the disease COVID-19. The virus was isolated 
from a patient in the U.S.and is seen here emerging from the surface 
of cells — in gray — cultured in the lab. Image from NIAID-RML
     Schatz said the Trump administration "doesn't much care about science" or governing, and that they find such subjects "boring." He said this has led to the defunding of programs that are supposed to help prevent a global pandemic, such as the nine percent cut to funding for the Centers for Disease Control, and the Trump budget that would halve the U.S.'s funding of the World Health Organization. He also brought up that the top global health position on the National Security Council was vacant for about two years before the position was "cut."
     Schatz is in a group of U.S. Senators, including Mazie Hirono, working to clearly establish the process for states to receive federal reimbursement for costs from COVID-19 containment efforts.
     The number of cases in the U.S.of the virus is still 15. There are more than 72,500 cases of COVID-19 in China. More than two dozen other countries also have confirmed cases. The death toll is nearly 2,000 people, mostly in China.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

IN LOSS OF POPULATION, HAWAIʻI ranks fifth in the nation, according to the career website Zippia. It recently named the top ten states for 2017-2018, for percentage of residents who moved to another state. New York ranked first in population loss, losing 307,000 residents - 1.57 percent in a year - followed by New Jersey, West Virginia, and Louisiana.
     Hawaiʻi ranked fifth with a loss of 7,047 residents, with 0.5 percent of the population leaving the islands. According to Zippia, Hawaiʻi residents headed out for California, Texas, Nevada, Washington, and North Carolina.
     The fastest-growing state is Arizona, which gained 155,376 residents a 2.17 percent population increase in 2017-2018. See Zippia.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A Hawaiian monk seal pup, left, and its mom bask in the sun on the sand on a Hawaiian shore. The endangered,
endemic mammals' pupping season will begin soon. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL PUPPING SEASON is coming up. Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response asks the public to watch for the endangered mammals and document their activities. National Oceanographic & Atmospheric Administration states that, while Hawaiian monk seals can give birth at any time of year, many pups in the past three or four years have been born during the spring and summer.
     Hawaiʻi Marine Marine Animal Response gives an overview:
     Monk seals are born weighing about 25-35 pounds, are black in color, and nurse on land for about five to seven weeks. During that time, it is important to minimize disturbance as much as possible to ensure the mother remains with her pup and the animals develop a normal mom-pup relationship. This ensures the pup gets the nutrition it needs to fuel proper development and is given the best chance at long-term survival.
     Only about 300 Hawaiian monk seals remain in the main Hawaiian Islands, so every pup is important. Giving mom-pup pairs space can help support population recovery for Hawaiian monk seals.
A young pup is held close by its mom on the sand. Hawaiian monk seals,
one of only two endemic mammals in Hawaiʻi - both are endangered - need
protection from harm and disturbances in order to survive and thrive
as a species. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
     It is very important to never feed a Hawaiian monk seal. After five to seven weeks, the mom leaves the pup on its own. If young monk seals are fed by humans during this time, they may not learn how to hunt for themselves. This lowers the animals' chance of survival.
     Mother seals can be very protective of their young and are more likely to exhibit territorial behavior with a pup. For both animal and human safety, humans are asked to stay at least 150 feet away from Hawaiian monk seals, to stay behind any fencing or signs,  and to listen carefully to the instructions of HMAR personnel on sites. This helps keep the seals wild.
     To minimize traffic and potential disturbances at pupping sites, specific pupping locations are typically not announced by HMAR or NOAA.
     If a mom and pup are seen on a beach with no signage, fencing, or HMAR personnel present, please call the HMAR hotline immediately at (888) 256-9840. This number is also used to report any monk seal sightings, and for turtles, dolphins, or whales that may be in distress. To report seabirds in distress please call (808) 687-7900.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See Christy Lasseter & Friends tomorrow night at Kīlauea Visitor Center
Auditorium. Courtesy photo
ATTEND THE NĀ LEO MANU (HEAVENLY VOICES) HAWAIIAN MUSIC CONCERT with Christy Lassiter & Friends tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 19 at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in HawaiʻVolcanoes National Park. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. The Park announcement states: "This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A WIND ADVISORY is in effect for Kaʻū and most of Hawaiʻi Island through Thursday, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m.according to the National Weather Service. The public should expect northeast winds of 20 to 35 miles per hour, with gusts over 50 mph.
     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense said today that the public: should secure outdoor items such as tents and outdoor furniture. Motorists, especially in high profile vehicles, are urged to drive with caution. Be aware of downed trees, utility disruptions, and that road closures may occur without notice. Stay clear of downed utility lines and report any to authorities.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Wrestling
Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule
Girls Softball
Saturday, March 7, 11 a.m., @Waiakea
Wednesday, March 11, 3 p.m., @Konawaena
Boys Baseball
Wednesday, March 4, 3 p.m., host HPA
Saturday, March 7, 1 p.m.. @Waiakea
Boys Volleyball
Friday, Feb. 21, 4:30 p.m., Preseason at Christian Liberty
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 6 p.m., host Christian Liberty
Judo
Saturday, Feb. 29, 10:30 a.m., @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 7, 10:30 a.m.. @Kealakehe
Track
Saturday, March 14, 9 a.m., @Waiakea
Saturday, March 21, 2 p.m., @Konawaena

UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19
Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to 6 p.m., Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21
Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is served p.m. to 8 p.m. Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.

SATURDAY, FEB. 22
Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22, 11 a.m. volcanoartcenter.org

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 28
Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association Annual Health Conference, Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Register in advance: 808-928-0101.

SATURDAY, FEB. 29
Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, Feb. 29 and March 28, 7:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.

Mixed Media Photo Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Feb. 29, 10 a.m. The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students. volcanoartcenter.org

ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to 3:30 p.m., through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, 6:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.
     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.
     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

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