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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, February 20, 2020

Learn advanced means of keeping bees at a workshop this weekend. See details below. Photo by Julia Neal
A BILL TO ALLOW LARGER GREENHOUSES AND SHADE HOUSES, without building permits, passed the state House of Representatives this week. HB 2192 HD1, introduced by Hawaiʻi Island Rep. David Tarnas, proposes to increase the maximum area, from 20,000 to 60,000 square feet, for each agricultural shade cloth structure, cold frame, or greenhouse that is qualified for an exemption from building permit and building code requirements. 
     "This bill supports Hawaiʻi's local food production and sustainability goals by making it easier for local farmers to build modern greenhouses without having to go through a lengthy and costly permitting process," said Tarnas.
Kaʻū Valley Farms nursery greenhouse above Na`alehu.
.Photo by Lee Neal
     HB2192 received public support from the Department of Agriculture, Hawaiʻi County Councilman Tim Richards, Hawaiʻi Farm Bureau, Ulupono Initiative, Hawaiʻi Farming LLC, Big Island Produce Asset Holdings LLC, Hawaiʻi Aquaculture & Aquaponics Association, and one individual. 
     Testifiers in support of HB2192 stated that the bill is necessary to support local producers to make farming more profitable and productive across Hawaiʻi. "We believe that opening the door to new investments in agricultural infrastructure will directly support more local food production and an economically robust homegrown agriculture industry, which strengthens our community with fresh, healthy food," said Amy Hennessey, Senior Vice President of Communications and External Affairs at Ulupono Initiative.
     HB2192 House Draft 1 is the first of Rep. Tarnas' 2020 bills to pass Third Reading in the House this session. HB2192 now crosses over for consideration in the Senate. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AFTER WEDNESDAY'S DEMOCRATIC DEBATE WITHOUT TULSI GABBARD, and without her receiving invitations to CNN Town Hall meetings, her presidential campaign released a statement: "Despite complete media blackouts and DNC bias, Tulsi is still climbing in the polls."
     The statement contends that Gabbard is beating a billionaire, "who is quite literally outspending us 16 to one. Not only are we beating him in the polls, but we're also outraising him 12 to one on grassroots donations." The Tulsi 2020 group also states that "nearly half of primary voters" still haven't decided who they want to vote for. Her campaign message is that "the establishment elite and its allies in the media have been trying to count us out — by ignoring us, attacking us, and moving the goalposts — since the very moment we launched. They feel threatened by Tulsi, whose support cannot be bought and whose message cannot be influenced... Can you imagine what this election would look like for Tulsi if she was given anything close to the kind of media treatment that's been handed to candidates favored by the establishment? Or if she had even a small fraction of the hundreds of millions already spent by the billionaire candidates?
     "We don't have to imagine, we know from our own work on the ground that when voters from all parties learn about Tulsi and hear her message for the people, they get it. They see someone with integrity, honesty and a new hopeful vision for the country we all love. A candidate with the firsthand experience necessary to be commander in chief on Day One."
     The Emerson College poll, Feb. 16 to 18, presented by the Gabbard campaign, shows Gabbard in seventh among sampling of primary and caucus voters, with Bernie Sanders in the lead, Joe Biden second, followed by Michael Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, and Amy Klobuchar.
     "Would you vote for your candidate or is there a chance you would vote for someone else?" The poll showed more than 50 percent undecided.
     The billionaire in third place is Michael Bloomberg and the billionaire behind Gabbard in this poll is Tom Steyer.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY WILL HOLD A PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY VOTE AMONG ITS MEMBERS ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 to determine assignment of delegates to the National Convention where the Democratic candidate for President will be named.
     Those who want to participate must be registered to vote in the state of Hawaiʻi and registered with the Democratic Party by Sunday, March 8 to vote by mail. Those who join the party between Monday, March 9 through April 4 can vote at polling stations on April 4. The Kaʻū polling station for Democrats will be at Ocean View Community Center at 92-8924 Leilani Circle. Other locations around Hawaiʻi Island are at Keaʻau Elementary School, Hilo Intermediate School, Kealakehe High School , or Waimea Elementary School. The polling places are open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     All ballots for the primary should be mailed by Saturday, March 28 to assure delivery to the Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi's Honolulu post office box on or before April 4 at 3 p.m.   
     To register to vote online, see olvr.hawaii.gov/register.aspx. To register to be a member of the Democratic Party of Hawai‘i online or print and mail in an application, see hawaiidemocrats.org/join.
     The Democratic Party has decided to put its delegates behind presidential candidates through a process called rank choice voting. Voters select a first, second, and third favorite candidate.
     A candidate must receive at least 15 percent of the votes to earn a delegate. 
     When the ballots are tabulated, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. The second choices of those who voted for the first eliminated candidate are added to the remaining candidates' vote totals. Then, the candidate with the fewest votes after that second tabulation is eliminated. The next choice of those who voted for the second eliminated candidate are then added to the remaining candidates' vote totals and the candidate with the fewest votes after that third tabulation is eliminated.
     The ranked choice tabulation and elimination rounds continue until all the remaining candidates have at least 15 percent of the votes. Delegates to the Democratic National Convention are then awarded to the remaining candidates proportionally to their final vote tally. Learn more at hawaiiRCV2020.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KUPU CARE PALLIATIVE PROGRAM RECEIVED A $25,000 GRANT from the Max and Yetta Karasik Family Foundation. Serving East Kaʻū from Volcano to South Point, and all of East Hawaiʻi, the program is run by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, formerly Hospice of Hilo.
     In an announcement, Development Manager Keith Greer said, "Since 2012, Kupu Care has set a strong foundation for palliative care in East Hawaiʻi and this grant, combined with a new partnership with United Health Care, will help reinvigorate this program.
     "Palliative Care is an emerging medical specialty and many people don't know if it is right for their loved one; if they see their family member becoming less responsive, difficulty getting in and out of the bed or wheelchair, or they are visiting the emergency room more frequently, Palliative Care may be able to help."
     Patients remain under the care of their own physicians in Kupu Care, and get an extra layer of support from the Kupu Care team. Hawaiʻi Care Choices provides Palliative, Hospice, and Bereavement Care services to all of East Hawaiʻifrom Laupāhoehoe Point to South Point.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN ADVANCED BEEKEEPING CLASS will be held Saturday, Feb. 22 and March 21 from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.in Hilo. The address will be provided upon registration. Experienced beekeepers are invited to participate in this workshop series about apiary expansion and management. Presented by Bee Love Apiaries, there is no cost to attend; however, registration is required in advance due to limited space. RSVP by contacting Jen Rasmussen at 808-640-0278 or jennyabach@gmail.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Wrestling
Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule
Girls Softball
Saturday, March 7, 11 a.m., @Waiakea
Wednesday, March 11, 3 p.m., @Konawaena
Saturday, March 14, 11 a.m., host Kealakehe
Boys Baseball
Wednesday, March 4, 3 p.m., host HPA
Saturday, March 7, 1 p.m.. @Waiakea
Tuesday, March 10, 1 p.m., @Konawaena
Saturday, March 14, 1 p.m., host Kealakehe
Boys Volleyball
Friday, Feb. 21, 4:30 p.m., Preseason at Christian Liberty
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 6 p.m., host Christian Liberty
Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo
Judo
Saturday, Feb. 29, 10:30 a.m., @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 7, 10:30 a.m.. @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 14, 10:30 a.m., @Hilo
Track
Saturday, March 14, 9 a.m., @Waiakea

UPCOMING
FRIDAY, FEB. 21
Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is served p.m. to 8 p.m. Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.

SATURDAY, FEB. 22
Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration closed Wednesday, Feb. 19. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22, 11 a.m. volcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, FEB. 23
Kaʻū Portuguese Exhibit, Sunday, Feb. 23 at Carvalho Park in Hilo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Exhibit by Kaʻū Multicultural Society.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 4:30 p.m.

ONGOING
Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, 6:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.
     Performers are Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.
     Tickets are $30, available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

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