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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, February 23, 2020

Nearly cloudless skies and a strong breeze accompanies keiki and their families at Punalauu Black Sand Beach on 
Saturday during the annual OKK Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive. Photo by Shalan Crysdale
THE 12TH ANNUAL ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU KEIKI FISHING TOURNAMENT drew hundreds of keiki and their families to the shore of Punaluʻu Bay on Saturday, Feb. 15. The catch and release, and marine education, event was sponsored by OKK, Department of Land and Natural Resources Enforcement Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Barbless Circle Hook Project, Marine Wildlife Program, County of Hawaiʻi, S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo, and Suisan Company, Ltd. Keiki and their families brought canned items in a food drive and they received a lunch.
Volunteer removing the hook and measuring
the fish. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
     Most Fish went to Rylan Egusa.
     First place for Largest Āholehole went to Zy Sanchez, second place went to Makamae Parent, and third went to Alakai Baji.
     First place for Largest Kupipi went to Hokulani Cariaga-Pascual and second went to Derek Higashi.
Zy Sanchez took first place for Largest
Āholehole. Photo by Lee McIntosh
     First place for Largest Poʻo Paʻa went to Arabella Ortega, second place went to Kendrick Saplan, and third went to Evan Bebeau.
     First place for Largest Hinaleʻa went to Chesney-Jo Hara and second went to Kaimana Kawaʻauhau-Young.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Chesney-Jo Hara took first place for 
Largest Hinaleʻa. Photo by Lee McIntosh
BANNING USE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS FOR THOSE UNDER 25 YEARS OF AGE is a measure that could still have life in the Hawaiʻi Legislature this year. Introduced by west Kaʻū Rep. Richard Creagan, House Bill 2507 HD1 would have fined first offenders $500.
Hokulani Cariaga-Pascual took first place for
Largest Kupipi. Photo by Lee McIntosh
     The bill passed the house Committee on Health and a reading on the floor of the House of Representatives. However, it languished, without further required hearings before a Feb. 14 deadline to pass it over to the Senate. According to Creagan, the bill still has hope and could come back to life with amendments.
     In 2016, Hawaiʻi was the first state to make use of tobacco products illegal for those under 21, leading to other states, counties, and cities raising the legal age. The federal government adopted the 21-year old minimum last December for the entire country.
     A bill to ban flavored tobacco products, except menthol and tobacco flavors, Senate Bill 2903, passed the state Senate Committee on Ways & Means on Friday.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
     
HIKING MINIMUM WAGE AND TAX BENEFITS FOR WORKING FAMILIES are aims of a bill in the state House of Representatives.  HB 2541 HD1 passed through the House Committee on Labor & Public Employment and the Committee on Finance on Friday. It moves on to the full House for second reading.
Keiki concentrate on their casting with handpoles on Saturday. Photo by Shalan Crysdale
     The bill was introduced by Kaʻū's state Representatives Richard Onishi and Richard Creagan and is supported by Hawaiʻi Chamber of Commerce. HB 2541 HD1 - Helping Working Families - would increase the minimum wage rate to $11 per hour beginning on Jan. 1, 2021, $12 per hour beginning on Jan. 1, 2022, $12.50 per hour beginning on Jan. 1, 2023, and $13 per hour beginning on Jan. 1, 2024. It would also make the state earned income tax credit refundable and permanent, and increase the refundable food/excise tax credit.
Arabella Ortega took first place for 
Largest Poʻo Paʻa.Photo by Lee McIntosh
     The measures are proposed in the joint House-Senate-Governor proposal to preserve existing benefits for the most economically vulnerable workers. It would ensure that minimum wage workers would be less likely to have health care premiums, paid by employers, compromised when employers reduces hours to compensate for a mandated wage increase that they cannot afford. The proposal seeks to increase wages without inadvertently reducing an employee's hours or present benefits.
Rylan Egusa took Most Fish. 
Photo by Lee McIntosh
     The bill package tackles the issues highlighted in the Aloha United Waysponsored report, "ALICE: A Study of Financial Hardship in Hawaii." The ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) describes the economic hardships facing many working individuals and families in Hawaiʻi. According to the report, after allocating funds to pay for expenses such as housing, child care, food, taxes, health care, and transportation, a family of four needs to earn roughly $77,000 a year simply to survive.
     Read more at: Working Class Economic Support PackageStar Advertiser Editorial: Working Families Need More Relief.
     House Finance Committee Chair Sylvia Luke said this bill is one of several bills to address Hawaiʻi's cost of living obstacles for working class families and individuals. "In this package of bills which deals with affordable housing, child care and minimum wage, what we are trying to do is take care of the working families," she said.
Volunteers hand out poles, bucket, and bait to keiki as old as 14 on Saturday, for the annual catch and release event.
Photo by Shalan Crysdale
     Rep. Aaron Ling Johanson, Chair of the Labor & Public Employment Committee, said this one bill is not meant to be the singular fix for all of the root causes of Hawaiʻi's high cost of living. "This is a minimum wage increase; bottom line: under this proposed legislation, workers are going to make more income. Additionally, the less talked about, but very important feature of this particular legislation is the $70+ million in new tax relief for all working families and individuals. The legislation increases wages and delivers assistance to the many workers and working class families that need help now in a net beneficial way."

Makamae Parent second first place for 
Largest Āholehole.Photo by Lee McIntosh
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THE FOURTH FATAL SMALL AIRCRAFT CRASH IN THE STATE in the last year, killed two pilots in a single engine Cessna used to taxi glider planes into air. The Saturday morning crash at Dillingham Airfield on Oʻahu sparked responses from U.S. Congressman Ed Case and U.S. Sen Brian Schatz.
Derek Higashi took second place for
Largest Kupipi. Photo by Lee McIntosh
     Case said, "It's unbelievable that our island community has suffered now a fourth fatal tragedy involving a tour helicopter/small aircraft in less than a year. I again join with the rest of Hawai‘i in extending my heartfelt condolences to the families and friends of those who were lost in this morning's incident.
Kaimana Kawaʻauhau-Young took second 
place for Largest Hinaleʻa. 
Photo by Lee McIntosh
     "While it will probably be more than a year until officials are able to determine the cause of this crash, the Federal Aviation Administration cannot treat this as an isolated incident as it did with the previous three, but must immediately ask itself the hard question it has thus far avoided of whether existing tour helicopter/small aircraft regulations are simply inadequate to protect the safety of those in the aircraft and of the over one million of us that they fly over every day."
Kendrick Saplan took second place for 
Largest Poʻo Paʻa.Photo by Lee McIntosh
     Schatz called for shutting down Dillingham, saying: "Our hearts are with those affected by today's tragic accident. It has become clear that Dillingham Airfield cannot continue to operate safely. Our obligation is to keep people safe, and the only way to do that is to keep the airfield closed. I urge the FAA and HDOT to shut down the airfield until they can guarantee safety of operations at Dillingham." The airfield was also the site of a crash in June that killed 11.
Evan Bebeau took third place for Largest
Poʻo Paʻa. Photo by Lee McIntosh
     Case's statement is in line with other vocal objectors to Hawaiʻi's lack of Air Tour Management Plans. Hawaiʻi Island Coalition Mālama Pono, the volunteer and self funded non-profit, states that ATMPs were mandated by Congress in 2000, but no action has been taken. Bob Ernst, president of the group, states Case is the only one of Hawaiʻi's congressional delegation that has tried to make a difference in how tour aircraft are operated in the state. Ernst said, "Shame on all those responsible for twenty years of complete failure, total disregard for the peoples/taxpayers/visitors National Parks."
Alakai Baji took third place for Largest
Āholehole. Photo by Lee McIntosh
     See more at hicop.org.

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TRAILBLAZERS: BUFFALO SOLDIERS IN HAWAIʻI will be the subject discussed at this month's Coffee Talk at the Visitor Center of Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on Friday, Feb. 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
     Buffalo Soldiers were among the first caretakers of U.S. national parks. Park founders like Thomas Jaggar, geologist for Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, knew they couldn't build a national park alone. African American soldiers, nicknamed Buffalo Soldiers, were instrumental in building and protecting many national parks, including Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
     Join park ranger Ben Hayes and learn the remarkable story of how one regiment of Buffalo Soldiers stationed in Hawai‘i carved a trail out of rough ʻaʻā lava rock to the top of Mauna Loa, assisted Dr. Jaggar in his field work, and left a legacy of hard work that served as a foundation for our national park.  
     Ben Hayes is the Chief of Interpretation and Education at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. He holds bachelors and masters degrees in history and began his NPS career as a volunteer in 2006.
     Enter the Kahuku unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, and meet near the parking area. Coffee will be available for purchase or attendees are welcome to bring their own. See nps.gov for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ST. JUDE'S MARDI GRAS DINNER FUNDRAISER will be held Friday, Feb. 28 at the church, 92-8660 Paradise Circle, Ocean View. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., dinner is served from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets are $8 per person, $15 per couple, and $20 per family, for jambalaya, red beans and rice, cornbread, drink, and dessert. Pre-purchase tickets from Thom White, Beverly Nelson, or Cordelia Burt. Questions? Call 808-939-7555 and leave a message.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LITTLE FIRE ANT WORKSHOP for commercial coffee, fruit, and nut growers will be held Wednesday, Feb. 26, from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room, 79-7381 Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua. Registration is required as the class is limited to 30 participants.
     Register at hawaiicoffeeed.com/lfa (preferred) or contact Matt at 808-322-0164 by Monday, Feb. 24. Participants will be given a free LFA sampling kit. 
     University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources and the Hawaiʻi Ant Lab will conduct the informational and interactive workshop on the invasive pest. Kiyoshi Adachi of HAL will teach participants about LFA management basics. He will guide participants in surveying for LFA and demonstrate mixing of bait for treatment in orchard crop situations. UH Extension faculty and staff will be assisting with this event.
Despite their small size, only 1/16th of an inch, Little Fire Ants are a danger
to humans, livestock, and plants. UH-CTAHR photo
     Wasmannia auropunctata, states UH-CTAHR, are "vicious little ants with a sting that can leave you in pain. They can be found in the home, in nearly any crack or crevice, or on the farm, in trees where they have been known to 'rain down' on people, causing serious welts and long lasting discomfort. If not controlled, LFA can become a major agricultural pest. They can infest fields, where they can damage crops and sting workers."
     Participants who suspect LFA are on their farm are asked to bring in a frozen/dead sample. Ants should be collected in a jar or plastic container with a tight lid, frozen for at least two days, and be labeled with name, collection location, and contact information.
     Those who register and are unable to make the workshop, please contact Matt at 808-322-0164 or Andrea at andreak@hawaii.edu as soon as possible to give someone else the opportunity to attend.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Queensland Longhorn Beetle. Photo from biisc.org
THE PUBLIC IS ASKED TO HELP ASSESS GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF THE INVASIVE QUEENSLAND LONGHORN BEETLE. The USDA has put together a short survey to determine its location son Hawaiʻi Island and to identify volunteers – both growers with beetles and growers without – to participate in future trapping and other studies.
     To participate in the survey, click here.
     The invasive beetle, known by the official name Acalolepta aesthetica, is causing extensive damage to such trees as ulu- breadfruit, cacao and kukui trees by burrowing through their trunks, and ultimately killing them. The insect poses a threat to Hawai‘i Island's growing number of cacao farmers, and endangers culturally important plants such as kukui and breadfruit trees. If the beetle spreads to the U.S. mainland, it would pose a direct threat to the $3.85 billion citrus industry, stated U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule
Girls Softball
Saturday, March 7, 11 a.m., @Waiakea
Wednesday, March 11, 3 p.m., @Konawaena
Saturday, March 14, 11 a.m., host Kealakehe
Boys Baseball
Wednesday, March 4, 3 p.m., host HPA
Saturday, March 7, 1 p.m.. @Waiakea
Tuesday, March 10, 1 p.m., @Konawaena
Saturday, March 14, 1 p.m., host Kealakehe
Boys Volleyball
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 6 p.m., host Christian Liberty
Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo
Tuesday, March 10, 6 p.m., host Makualani
Friday, March 13, 6 p.m., host Konawaena
Judo
Saturday, Feb. 29, 10:30 a.m., @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 7, 10:30 a.m.. @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 14, 10:30 a.m., @Hilo
Track
Saturday, March 14, 9 a.m., @Waiakea

UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 28
Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association Annual Health Conference, Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Register in advance: 808-928-0101.

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal ChurchFriday, Feb. 28 at the church, 92-8660 Paradise Circle, Ocean View. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., dinner is served from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets are $8 per person, $15 per couple, and $20 per family, for jambalaya, red beans and rice, cornbread, drink, and dessert. Pre-purchase from Thom White, Beverly Nelson, or Cordelia Burt. Questions? Call 808-939-7555 and leave a message.

SATURDAY, FEB. 29
Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, Feb. 29 and March 28, 7:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.

Mixed Media Photo Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Feb. 29, 10 a.m. The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students. volcanoartcenter.org

ONGOING
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, 6:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.
     Performers are Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.
     Tickets are $30, available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.

Sign Up Keiki for the Second Annual Kaʻū Children's Business Fair, to be held Saturday, March 21, 10 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Community Center. Open to young entrepreneurs ages seven and 18 to share their talents by selling handmade items and services. One application may be submitted for each business. Children can sign up for booth space at no charge. Children working as a group submit one application that includes each child's information; no more than three children per business.
     Kaʻū Children's Business Fair guidelines are designed to give children the experience of selling a product or service. Parents of younger children (under eight years old) may sit in the booth, but the children should be responsible for set up, customer interaction, and sales. Parents may aid a child, but the child runs the business.
    Learn more about participating at childrensbusinessfair.org/pahala. Visit Kaʻū Children's Business Fair's Facebook event page facebook.com/KAUCBF/. RSVP to the event at facebook.com/events/925342784527676/. Text KAUKIDSFAIR to 31996 for updates and information (message and data fees may apply).

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.
     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
     Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
     Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27, 5:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. at the race start.
     Half Marathon will start at 7 a.m. Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at 10 a.m. on VSAS grounds. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

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