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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, February 17, 2020

Over 1,000 participants, families, and volunteers enjoyed Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach last year during the annual ʻO Kaʻū
Kākou Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive. Deadline to sign up for this year's event is
Wednesday at noon. Learn how, below. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
SUBMIT TESTIMONY ON THE HELICOPTER NOISE ACT. Called RETURN SERENITY AND SAFETY TO HAWAIʻI, Senate Bill 2649 will be the subject of public decision making by the Commerce, Consumer Protection, & Health Committee on Thursday. Feb. 20, at the state capitol. Written testimony is due by Wednesday morning before 10 a.m.; submit online at capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=2649&year=2020.
     The legislation would require tour helicopters in the state to keep their noise footprint out of all occupied properties. The noise from helicopters has been an ongoing issue for residents of Kaʻū, especially those close to Volcano.
     The legislation would also require tour helicopters to add safety measures: FAA-approved floatation devices and an Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast device which tracks all helicopter flights in an area to help avoid crashes and to help find downed craft.
     Tour helicopters that do not follow these rules would be denied new or renewal of permits, or have their permits taken away, and they would not be allowed to operate in Hawaiʻi.
     Bob Enrst, president of Hawaiian Island Coalition Mālama Pono, HICOP, shared his testimony that he wrote to the committee: "This legislation will return serenity and safety to all occupied properties in Hawaiʻi." He said the Federal Aviation Authority has "failed to implement" National Transportation Safety Board recommendation regarding flotation on all tour helicopters, and that the recommendation "was implemented because of Hawaiʻi fatalities from tour helicopters." He said the FAA has failed to require tour helicopters to be equipped with and operate ADS-B.
     Ernst also said the FAA's last hearing in Hawaiʻi on the subject was in August of 2018, that the FAA's failure to attend further public roundtable meetings has led to them ending, and that when the FAA did attend meetings, no action was taken regarding public input. He said, "The FAA has abdicated all responsibilities and duties regarding tour copters in Hawaiʻi."
     Ernst said the Return Serenity and Safety to Hawaiʻi Act "will definitely improve the quality of life for those on the ground but will also benefit the tour copter operators in that all complaints will stop, crashed copters will not sink therefore passengers will not drown, operation locations will be known so first responders can find wreckage quicker, and the tour copter operators can continue their businesses unhindered."
     See more at hicop.org.
     Written testimony from the Transportation Committee hearing on Jan. 29 state was almost entirely in support of the bill, mostly from individuals and neighborhood communities on other islands.
     Another bill, SB3154, covers basically the same issues. The Transportation and the Energy, Economic Develpoment, & Tourism Committees deferred that bill on Feb. 3. Written testimony for that bill was very much the other way, with only four in support. Testimony against the bill was submitted by Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Activities & Attractions Association of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Helicopter Association, Paradise Helicopters, Magnum Helicopters, Jack Harter Helicopters, Inc., and the Department of the Attorney General.
Paradise Helicopters carried residents, scientists, and documentarians
over the 2018 Kīlauea eruption flows. Photo from Tropical Visions Video
     Calvin Dorn, of Paradise Helicopters, said he opposed SB3154 because the bill overrides FAA rules already in place. He said flotation devices "are not a panacea for helicopter operations and can lead to overreliance on equipment that can fail."He also said that the NTSB "takes years to determine the cause of accidents and comes up with broad recommendations that may or may not be applicable to operations in Hawaii. The incorporation of all NTSB safety recommendations would place an unnecessary financial burden on operators and may not improve safety in Hawaiʻi. The requirement for ADSB does not address any specific safety program or reduce helicopter noise." He also said that tour aircraft in Hawaiʻi "are required to fly at a minimum of 1,500 feet above the ground over residential areas."
     Dorn said his company employs 100 people throughout the state, and that "helicopters make noise but also provide jobs and an environmentally safe way for our visitors to see the beauty that is Hawaiʻi. No roads, no bathrooms, no trails, no introduction of invasive species are needed for helicopters and airplanes to conduct aerial tours. What we provide for Hawaiʻi is jobs and an activity for visitors and local families as well as supplemental helicopter support in times of Natural Disaster."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Award winning coffee farmer Lorie Obra said she supports childcare 
for Marshallese coffee workers in Kaʻū. Photo from alohagrown
ATTEND THE PUBLIC MEETING OF KEIKI O PALEHUA ʻOHANA on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 4 p.m. in the Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St.in Pāhala.
     Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development, and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation, which runs Tūtū & Me.
     Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it."
     Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Members of the Mochida family wait in Hayward, California, for their 
"evacuation" bus. Each wears an ID tag. The family operated a nursery 
and five greenhouses in Hayward
Photo from National Archives, Dorothea Lange, May 8, 1942
THE SHORT FILM MINIDOKA: AN AMERICAN CONCENTRATION CAMP will be shown tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. held at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address on Japanese American internment during World War II.
     "Most people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in the Park was also used as a Japanese internment camp during World War II," states the announcement. The newly released 30-minute film "reveals how unconstitutional imprisonment not only turned lives upside down but continues to ripple through generations and serves as a warning today.
     "On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the exclusion and unjust incarceration of 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents of Japanese ancestry living in the United Statesduring World War II. Today, the National Park Service protects and collaboratively manages some of the former internment camps including ManzanarTule LakeMinidoka, and Honouliuli."
     Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor.
Risa and Yasubei Hirano and their son George posed in front of an American 
flag. Risa is holding a photograph of her son Shigera in uniform. The Hiranos 
were held at the Colorado River internment camp during World War II. This 
image "captures both the patriotism and the deep sadness these proud 
Japanese Americans felt," states the National Park Service caption. 
Public domain via National Archives
     From the National Park Service website: "This was all the time Japanese American families had to pack all their belongings. Forced from their homes, they could only bring what they could carry. They had no idea where they were going or for how long. The National Park Service preserves the places where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. Follow the stories of their relocation, internment, and resettlement."
     For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.
     After Dark in the Park is one of many programs sponsored by the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SIGN UP BY WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 AT NOON FOR ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU'S 12TH ANNUAL FISHING TOURNAMENT AND CANNED FOOD DRIVE. The event will be held this Saturday, Feb. 22. Last year's tournament had over 275 keiki entrants, and the shores held almost 1,000 participants and volunteers. Those fishing in the ocean catch, measure, and release their catches.
The shores of Punaluʻu will be flooded with keiki catching and releasing
handpole-caught fish this Saturday. Sign up by noon on Wednesday.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
     The free tournament, held each year at Punaluʻu Black Sand Beach Park Pavillions, is a huge draw for Kaʻū residents. Whole families make a day of it. Keiki as young as one year old up to age 14 can register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up a registration form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773.
     All attendees are encouraged to bring canned or non-perishable food to the event. "One can, if can. If no can, no can."
     Fishing guidelines are: a parent or legal guardian must accompany keiki at all times; handpole fishing with barbless hooks only; personally owned hand poles are allowed; hand poles, gear, and bait are provided; no chumming or using palu (bread, mackerel, etc.) allowed; all fishing is catch and release.
Keiki as young as one year old can participate in the free 12th annual
  ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive.
OKK photo
     Tournament check-in is 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Welcome and rules announcement is 9 a.m.Poles, gear, and bait are handed out at 9:30 a.m. Fishing time runs from 10 a.m.to 11:30 a.m. Free lunch is provided for all attendees, no matter the age, from noon to 12:30 p.m. Awards and prizes are handed out at 1 p.m.; keiki must be present to win. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Special prizes are awarded to the top three largest catch in each of five categories: Largest Kupipi, Largest Po‘opa‘a, Largest Hinalea, Largest Āholehole, and Most Caught.
     Other sponsors of the event include Department of Land and Natural Resources Enforcement Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Barbless Circle Hook Project, Marine Wildlife Program, County of Hawaiʻi, S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo, and Suisan Company, Ltd.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Wrestling
Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule
Girls Softball
Saturday, March 7, 11 a.m., @Waiakea
Wednesday, March 11, 3 p.m., @Konawaena
Boys Baseball
Wednesday, March 4, 3 p.m., host HPA
Saturday, March 7, 1 p.m.. @Waiakea
Boys Volleyball
Friday, Feb. 21, 4:30 p.m., Preseason at Christian Liberty
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 6 p.m., host Christian Liberty
Judo
Saturday, Feb. 29, 10:30 a.m., @Kealakehe
Saturday, March 7, 10:30 a.m.. @Kealakehe
Track
Saturday, March 14, 9 a.m., @Waiakea
Saturday, March 21, 2 p.m., @Konawaena

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 7 p.m.KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19
Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to 6 p.m., Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21
Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is served p.m. to 8 p.m. Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.

SATURDAY, FEB. 22
Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22, 11 a.m. volcanoartcenter.org

ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to 3:30 p.m., through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, 6:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.
     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.
     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

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