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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, January 27, 2020

An upwelling of orange lava from a lower level flowed over a stream of darker red lava on the floor of this lava
tube. Spectacular lava tubes are the subject of a talk in Ocean View this Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at Ocean View
Community Center. See more below. Photo by Peter and Annie Bosted
PROPERTY TAXES FLOWING DIRECTLY TO EDUCATION is the goal of a bill submitted to the sate legislature today by Speaker of the House Scott Saiki. He introduced HB 2671, a constitutional amendment proposing that the Board of Education hold concurrent real property tax authority to fund teacher compensation. "Concurrent" means the counties would share real property tax authority with the BOE.
     Said Saiki, "HB 2671 addresses the question of how to fund increased teacher compensation. The general public and business community must weigh in on whether taxes should be raised to increase
teacher salaries, and, if so, whether a real property tax is an appropriate source of revenue. If approved by the Legislature, HB 2671 will be placed on the 2020 general 
election ballot and voters will have the opportunity to ratify it." The ballot would read: "Shall the Constitution of the State of Hawaiʻi be amended by repealing the counties' exclusive jurisdiction over real property taxation and providing instead that the taxation of real property shall be under the concurrent jurisdiction of both the board of education and counties, thereby allowing the board of education to levy real property taxes to fund teacher compensation?"
     A separate bill, HB 2662, was introduced to statutorily implement the constitutional amendment if it is ratified. HB 2662 is a "short form" bill that requires the Legislature to insert statutory implementation language. The bill has been referred to its committees for public hearings.
     In most places on the mainland, school districts are funded within borders of cities, towns, and neighborhoods. Higher property taxes bring in more money for schools in wealthier neighborhoods.
     In Hawaiʻi, the school district covers the entire state, aiming to treat all children equally in quality of education. Some critics state that separating school funding from property taxes has created an underfunded public education system in Hawaiʻi. This is one of the reasons Hawaiʻi boasts the lowest property taxes in the country, making it a draw for outside investors in real estate.

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AN ANTIDISCRIMINATION BILL FOR REFUGEES AND ASYSLUM-SEEKERS was lauded today at rally in Washington, D.C. featuring Sen. Mazie Hirono. Today, on the third anniversary of the announcement of President Trump's Muslim Ban, the U.S. Senator joined Congressional Democrats, faith leaders, and civil rights advocates urging swift passage of S. 1123, the National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act. "If passed, the legislation would permanently end the Administration's discriminatory policy," said a statement from Hirono.
     Hirono said, "The Muslim Ban is sadly only one part of the Trump Administration's virulent and cruel anti-immigrant agenda. In addition to the Muslim Ban, there was the separation of children at the border, the detention of families with no end in sight, and many more harmful policies. Every day, Stephen Miller and others in the Trump Administration find new ways to hurt immigrants in our country. We must stand together in opposing these discriminatory policies."
      In addition to members of Congress, leaders from Muslim Advocates, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the National Women's Law Center, Bend the Arc Jewish Action, National Council of Jewish Women, and NAACP Washington Bureau participated in the rally.
Sen. Mazie Hirono at today's rally on a law to end discrimination of
refugees and asylum-seekers. Photo from Hirono
     The statement from Hirono said that the NO BAN Act "underscores America's commitment to protecting refugees and asylum-seekers. The bill is supported by more than 250 members of Congress; over 400 national security, civil rights, faith, and community organizations; 19 state attorneys general; and more than 50 immigration law professors."
     As the Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on The Constitution, Senator Hirono has been a persistent and vocal critic of the Muslim Ban. In 2017, she called for President Trump to rescind the Muslim Ban. In 2018, she joined 30 Senators in signing an amicus brief in support of the state of Hawaii in Trump v. Hawaii, a case challenging the Muslim Ban. Senators Hirono and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) successfully petitioned the Supreme Court to release same-day audio in Trump v. Hawaii.
     See video of today's rally.

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PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE WHALE COUNT ALONG THE KA‘Ū COAST last Saturday were released today. Local residents and visitors joined the Sanctuary Ocean Count and Great Whale Count to observe humpback whales from the shores of Hawaii Island, Kauai, Oahu, and Maui. The site for counting in Ka‘ū was Punaluu Black Sand Beach, where volunteers documented six whale sightings in the nearshore waters.
     More than 550 volunteers gathered data from the 53 sites across all the main Hawaiian Islands. They recorded 279 whale sightings during the 8:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. time period, the most of any time period throughout the day's count. The next whale county will be Saturday, Feb. 29. To sign up to watch from Ka Lae, Punaluu, and Milolii, go to oceancount.org.
     Conditions varied but the majority of sites were beautiful, clear and sunny with low wind, great weather for spotting whales. High surf, haze, and rain were present at several sites with unfavorable conditions for spotting whales. Turtles, sea birds, flying fish, and spotted/spinner dolphins revealed themselves across the main Hawaiian Islands. Some volunteers saw Hawaiian monk seals.
Whale watching at Punaluʻu on Saturday contributed to the official Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Michelle Nason
     Ocean Count promotes public awareness about humpback whales, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, and shore-based whale watching opportunities. Volunteer participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whales activity from the shorelines of Oahu, Kauai, and Hawaii islands. The humpbacks winter in Hawaiian water to give birth before heading north to summer feeding grounds.
     The Maui event is the annual Great Whale Count by Pacific Whale Foundation, which brings volunteers together to count whales from shore as part of a long-term survey of humpback whales, with 12 survey sites along the shoreline of Maui. This event provides a snapshot of trends in relative abundance of whales and is one of the world's longest-running citizen scientist projects.
A humpback whales seen last Saturday during the Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Dawn Graham
     Both counts take place three times during peak whale season: the last Saturdays in January, February, and March.
     Preliminary data detailing Sanctuary Ocean Count whale sightings by site location and volunteer sign-up are available at oceancount.org. Additional information will be available on Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary's website at hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.
     The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, administered by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources, protects humpback whales and their habitat in Hawaiian waters where they migrate each winter to mate, calve, and nurse their young.
     The National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, established in 2000, is the official non-profit partner of the National Marine Sanctuary System. The Foundation directly supports national marine sanctuaries by protecting species, conserving ecosystems and preserving America's maritime heritage through on-the-water conservation projects, public education and outreach programs, and scientific research and exploration.

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Colorful splatters from a long-ago lava flow are still in 
evidence on the walls of this lava tube on Hawaiʻi Island. 
White mineral deposits cover some of the splatters,
but have peeled away from the surface of others.
Photo by Peter and Annie Bosted
LAVA TUBES IN HAWAII  will be topic of a show at Ocean View Community Center this Tuesday  starting at 6:30. p.m. The show will be presented by veteran cavers, Peter and Annie Bosted, who have explored and photographed caves all over the world. They will explain why Hawaii Island has the world's longest and best lava tubes, and show photos of the wide variety of lava tubes on this island, from ice caves high on Mauna Loa to water and ocean-filled caves at the shores. Their photos will reveal unusual sights in lava tubes, from tiny cave-adapted bugs the size of a grain of rice, to highly colorful splatters of lava, and curtains of ‘ōhia tree roots.
     Lava tubes that are open to the public and cave conservation organizations will also be discussed. The Bosteds will explain what it takes to map a 20-mile-long lava tube system, a project that they, with other cave explorers, have undertaken in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

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HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK EVENTS for February continue the sharing of Hawaiian culture, stewardship programs, and opportunities to explore the main and Kahuku Unit portions of the Park. Events are free, but Park entrance fees may apply. Some programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association:
     Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series.
The American Wild Ensemble will perform at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National 
Park on Tuesday, Feb. 11. Photo courtesy of Geoff Shiel
     Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend the evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series.
     Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
Untitled painting by local artist Diana Miller, who will 
be in the spotlight on Tuesday, Feb. 4.
Photo courtesy of Diana Miller
     Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program.
     Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
     Stewardship of Kīpukapuaulu, every Thursday at 9:30 a.m., Feb. 6, 13, 20, and 27. Meet at the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot, Mauna Loa Road, off Highway 11 in the Park. Help remove troublesome plants at Kīpukapuaulu, home to diverse native forest and understory plants. Bring clippers or pruners, sturdy gloves, a hat, and water. Wear closed-toe shoes and clothing that you don't mind getting permanently stained from morning glory sap. Be prepared for cool and wet or hot and sunny weather. New volunteer? Contact Marilyn Nicholson for more info at nickem@hawaii.rr.com.
Christy Lassiter & Friends will perform at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
on Wednesday, Feb. 19. Photo courtesy of Christy Lassiter
     Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet at 8:45 a.m. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details.
     A Walk into the Past with Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, every Tuesday, Feb. 4, 11, 18, and 25 at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m. Each performance is about an hour. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Walk back to 1912, and meet the founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar,
Living history actor Dick Hershberger portrays Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, 
founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in a free program held 
on Tuesdays in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo/Janice Wei
at the edge of Kilauea Volcano. Dressed in period costume, Ka‘ū actor-director Dick Hershberger brings the renowned geologist to life. Dr. Jaggar will take you on a tour of his tiny lab located below the Volcano House to see original seismograph equipment and other early instruments. You'll learn what motivated Dr. Jaggar to dedicate his life to the study of Hawaiian volcanoes, and how his work helps save lives today. Space is limited; pick up your free ticket at the Kīlauea Visitor Center's front desk the day of the program. Program includes climbing stairs and entering a confined space. Supported by the Kīlauea Drama Entertainment Network (KDEN).
     Explore Kahuku. The Kahuku Unit is free, and is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Take a self-guided hike, or join rangers on weekends for a two-hour guided trek at 9:30 a.m. Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Kahuku is located in Ka‘ū, and is about a 50-minute drive south of the park's main entrance. Sturdy footwear, water, rain gear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended for all hikes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Girls Basketball
Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Boys Basketball
Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Soccer
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

Wrestling
Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

Swimming
Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, JAN. 28
After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 11:30a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.

THURSDAY, JAN. 30
Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 11a.m.-noonPāhala Community Center. 928-3102

The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, 6p.m.Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 4-6p.m.Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, JAN. 31
Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

SATURDAY, FEB. 1
Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at 12:30p.m. Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org

Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, FEB. 2
Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at 11 a.m. with kick-off at 1:30 p.m., 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 4 p.m.

ONGOING
Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
     The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 
     The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

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