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Michigan News - November 2019



Iron Labs Enters
Settlement with MRA

According to a report by the Las Vegas Journal-Review, the new anti-corruption task force in Nevada has already started conducting surprise spot inspections at several of the states testing facilities.  Governor Steve Sisolak birthed the multi-agency team in an effort to “Root out corruption or criminal influences” in the states legal marketplace.

It all started with a federal indictment from New York, in which was detailed a failed attempt by a group with foriegn ties to acquire a retail cannabis license by donating money to the political campaigns of two Nevada officials.  Gov. Sisolak has ordered the task force to also investigate “onging issues” such as “serious allegations of manipulated test results”, and the state’s licensing process, which has become a web of litigation.

Alongside this news came the announcement that Nevada will place a temporary freeze on the sale and transfer of new and existing marijuana business licenses.  This hot market saw four provisioning centers sold in the second half of 2018 for between $40 and $290 million dollars each.  Will Adler, a marijuana consultant and policy lobbyist, thought the decision fair, given recent controversies.


Flint Adult-Use Ban Fails
to Pass in Split Vote

An ordinance banning new recreational licensing in the city of Flint was struck down in a 4-4 split vote on October 14.  Both sides argued their case in heated discussion before the final call.

“This (ordinance) is the best route to go,” said Councilman Santino Guerra, “It’s a partial opt-in because the medical marijuana facilities are allowed to sell recreational marijuana.”  According to a fact sheet from the Flint Law Department the city needs an additional year to get resident and stakeholder feedback, despite other cities having been able to accomplish this in the time since the Nov. 1 deadline was announced.  Guerra, along with fellow members Kate Fields, Allan Griggs, and Eva Worthington, argued that the extended time would allow the council to draft and finalize a better ordinance, and voted in favor of the temporary partial ban on licensing.

In opposition stood council members Eric Mays, Maurice Davis, Jerri Winfrey-Carter, and Herb Winfrey, who heard statements from Flint residents like Zach Demkins prior to deciding, “It would prevent us (caregivers) from being competitive in the market.  (The city) is trying to shut us out when realistically (big companies) don’t live here or pay city taxes.  Us caregivers, we all live here and pay taxes.  All we want to do is just open the door to the public.  Without being here at the same time and without having an equal opportunity of transitioning into this license, we’re not going to be able to compete.”

Councilwoman Monica Gallaway was not present at the meeting and did not cast a vote.



Ottawa County Department
of Health Embraces Weed

With funding provided by LARA, the Department of Public Health in Ottawa county is openly accepting marijuana legalization as part of it’s duty to promote public well being.  According to spokesperson Becky Young, “We just want people to be safe.”

In a program similar to bike locks, or gun locks, the department is now giving out green ‘lock it up’ medicine bags that boldly feature a pot leaf on the side.  Like a bank bag, and kept secure by an included luggage style combination lock, they contain tips ranging from how to prevent accidental exposure (such as a child or pet eating a medible) and youth use, to information on laws, as well as directions on how to change the combination.

The bags are just one part of a regional effort to educate the public on adult-use cannabis safety, a move that further pushes West Michigan into looking like one of the most 420 friendly parts of the state.  Young stated that they are distributing as many as possible, having enlisted the help of local compassion clubs, jails, and DHS to help spread the word and hand out bags. 

Anyone interested in acquiring a ‘lock it up’ bag, and the information within, should call: 616-393-5791




Ann Arbor City Council
Approves Adult-Use

In a no surprise move the Ann Arbor City Council members voted 9-2 to approve recreational marijuana in the city.  Licenses will be allowed for provisioning centers, cannabis consumption lounges, growing, processing, safety compliance labs, and seed to sale micro-businesses, as well as temporary permits for events.  

Longtime activist Chuck Ream hopes to one day see an Ann Arbor where pot is flourishing, and available everywhere, “We want social use to follow legalization so the benefits of cannabis can really be recognized and felt in our community.  We didn’t legalize it for people to go hide and have it in their homes somewhere.  People really need to be able to get out and socialize so that cannabis can become an alternative to alcohol so that people can live a lot healthier, happier lives” he stated.

Many residents voiced concerns over users driving under the influence after leaving social clubs and gatherings.  To which cannabis activist Dennis Hayes responded, “The clinical evidence is that people who use marijuana and drive, drive slower.  And it’s true - the fact is marijuana people are probably safer than regular drivers, but that’s beside the point.”

Council member Jeff Hayner voted against the measure, believing the cities arbitrary limits on certain types of businesses could open up the city to litigation.  Hayner also expressed concerns over vaping, and ecological concerns, stating that large grows may be creating ozone and air quality issues.

Similar to other cities, Ann Arbor included spacing requirements in it’s ordinance, mandating that marijuana businesses not be placed within 600 feet of one another, or within 1,000 feet of a school.


Michigan Legal Cannabis
Sales Continue to Grow

In a no surprise move the Ann Arbor City Council members voted 9-2 to approve recreational marijuana in the city.  Licenses will be allowed for provisioning centers, cannabis consumption lounges, growing, processing, safety compliance labs, and seed to sale micro-businesses, as well as temporary permits for events.  

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